the tumblr of nana k.

my life is paper and ink and ISBNs

slushpilehell:

My novel is actually an instructional booklet for peace for world peace, in the form of a novel, in the form of a mystery, adventure, suspense novel. A drama.

And this is a rejection letter, in the form of a letter of rejection.

lol.

#DarkSkinRedLip

I’ve spent the last half-hour trying to write an appropriate eulogy for Karyn Washington, who recently passed away. I wanted to tell my story, the other side of the dark-skinned experience, growing up in a household where my skin tone was almost revered. I came to dislike many things about myself while growing up, but being black as hell was never one of them. I wanted to admit that I’ve only started wearing lipstick, after decrying makeup on the whole for a long time. But the telling is too complex. Suffice to say, I know my place in the culture of beauty: somewhere near the bottom, a few steps from falling off the edge entirely. Regardless, it took me 33 years to get to where Karyn Washington was at 22—accepting her appearance and going as far as to create a safe-space for the rest of us. A place of affirmation and support. It breaks my heart that we’ll never get to see her full potential.

http://www.darkskinredlip.com/

The luckiest one.
I just finished this book. I liked it. My two strongest impressions:
1. I’m slightly creeped out by elevators, knowing more about their inner-workings, but still too lazy to use the stairs (also wondering how the author didn’t spook himself out of using elevators entirely; I can only imagine he came across stories about some terrible elevator accidents).
2. Nicole Aragi, won’t you be my agent?

I just finished this book. I liked it. My two strongest impressions:

1. I’m slightly creeped out by elevators, knowing more about their inner-workings, but still too lazy to use the stairs (also wondering how the author didn’t spook himself out of using elevators entirely; I can only imagine he came across stories about some terrible elevator accidents).

2. Nicole Aragi, won’t you be my agent?

Blair Eadie of Atlantic-Pacific. She just kills me sometimes.

Blair Eadie of Atlantic-Pacific. She just kills me sometimes.

I stayed up ‘til midnight to buy one of these. Ok, I bought two. Now I am sleepy and crabby. Leave me alone; I have so little in my life, I might as well look good.

I stayed up ‘til midnight to buy one of these. Ok, I bought two. Now I am sleepy and crabby. Leave me alone; I have so little in my life, I might as well look good.

(Source: everlane)

I wanted to listen to some music to get me through this morning’s walk to work, but I couldn’t decide what, so I put spotify on shuffle. Apparently spotify thought I was in a bad mood because everything I got was all doom and gloom and my walk to work was laborious. But I love this song. It has such a beautiful rising action; it’s sort of like watching a flower bloom in slow-motion.

IF OKCUPID HAD AN AUTORESPONSE OPTION

dudeinpublishing:

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Set to “automatically reply to anyone whose message doesn’t pass spell check” and “automatically reply to anyone who clearly CTRL-V’d this turd of an opener”.

1. Yes.

2. I love that Dude in Publishing is posting all Harley Quinn, all day today.

THE FIRST TIME I TRIED MURAKAMI

dudeinpublishing:

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HAHA! Pretty much.

nprfreshair:

Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's new book Americanah explores the ‘strange construct’ of race in the United States. “You have to learn what it means to be black in America,” she says. In the interview she tells Terry Gross about why she aspired to have straight hair living in Nigeria:

"[T]he rite of passage from girl to woman is when you can go get a relaxer and have your hair straight. I remember looking forward very much to my last day of secondary school. … When I graduated secondary school, what I really wanted to do was go straight to the hair salon and get my relaxer, so my hair would be straight. Then I came to the U.S., and … I couldn’t afford to get a relaxer at a hair salon here because I thought it was just needlessly expensive. So I went to the drugstore and bought the relaxer kit and decided to do it myself, which didn’t end well. Having then a scalp with really bad burns, I suddenly thought, ‘Why am I even doing this?’ And that’s when I stopped using relaxers. And it took a while to accept my hair for the way that it grows from my head."

image via Random House

nprfreshair:

Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's new book Americanah explores the ‘strange construct’ of race in the United States. “You have to learn what it means to be black in America,” she says. In the interview she tells Terry Gross about why she aspired to have straight hair living in Nigeria:

"[T]he rite of passage from girl to woman is when you can go get a relaxer and have your hair straight. I remember looking forward very much to my last day of secondary school. … When I graduated secondary school, what I really wanted to do was go straight to the hair salon and get my relaxer, so my hair would be straight. Then I came to the U.S., and … I couldn’t afford to get a relaxer at a hair salon here because I thought it was just needlessly expensive. So I went to the drugstore and bought the relaxer kit and decided to do it myself, which didn’t end well. Having then a scalp with really bad burns, I suddenly thought, ‘Why am I even doing this?’ And that’s when I stopped using relaxers. And it took a while to accept my hair for the way that it grows from my head."

image via Random House